Daylight Map of the World

Do you have friends, relatives or business partners all over the world and in different time zones? In this case probably it is important for you to know the daylight period all over the world. On World and City Map’s daylight maps you can find out if this is the right time to call them, or it is better not to.

Daylight Saving Time (or summer time as it is called in many countries) is a way of getting more light out of the day by advancing clocks by one hour during the summer. During Daylight Saving Time, the sun appears to rise one hour later in the morning, when people are usually asleep anyway, and sets one hour later in the evening, seeming to stretch the day longer.

The reason DST works is because its saves energy due to less artificial light needed during the evening hours – clocks are set one hour ahead during the spring, and one hour back to standard time in the autumn. Many countries observe DST, and many do not.

Note: Between March – April through September – November, it is summer in the northern hemisphere, where many countries may observe DST, while in the southern hemisphere it is winter. During the rest of the year the opposite is true: it is winter in the northern hemisphere and summer in the southern.

Click here to view World Time Zones.

Google’s interactive daylight map

The decrease in daylight during the winter months is due to Earth’s axial tilt of 23 degrees. If the Earth was not tilted on its axis, the length of day and night would remain steady year long. During winter in the northern hemisphere there are less daylight hours, and the southern hemisphere in turn has longer daylight hours and experiences summer.

Daylight map shows the pattern of night and day on a Google map, for any area of the Earth, for any date and time.

The Mercator projection used here is one way of looking at the spherical earth as a flat map. Used since the 16th century for navigation, straight lines on this map can be used accurately as compass bearings but the size and shape of continents are distorted.

Watch the sun rise and set all over the world on this real-time, computer-generated illustration of the earth’s patterns of sunlight and darkness. The clouds are updated every 3 hours with current weather satellite imagery.

Watch the sun rise and set all over the world on this real-time, computer-generated illustration of the earth’s patterns of sunlight and darkness with Mollweide view. The clouds are updated every 3 hours with current weather satellite imagery.

Watch the sun rise and set all over the world on this real-time, computer-generated illustration of the earth’s patterns of sunlight and darkness with Hemisphere view.

Click here to view World Time Zones.